Lesson Plan: Version 2.0, TPACK Revision

Throughout the next couple weeks we will take the lesson we have chosen (see version 1.0 here) and analyze/revise it in the context of various “lenses”. The first is the TPACK framework, which I have outlined below.

My goal for this lesson is to take it from it’s current state, very dry and not based in constructivist philosophies, to a more engaging and inquiry based lesson. I will be viewing this lesson through the Technology Pedagogy and Content Knowledge (TPACK) framework. The first context this framework focuses on is technology. I will determine what kinds of technology can best help my students achieve the learning objective. Pedagogy is the the various methods I will employ to help my students learn my objective. Content knowledge is the well of knowledge that I have about my content area that I will draw from as I design and implement my lesson. The intersection of these three contexts is the focus of the TPACK framework (Mishra and Koehler, 2006).

Lesson Plan Version 1.0 (Through the TPACK Lens)

Technology

This lesson plan, in it’s current form, uses minimal technology. I use a whiteboard for the main instruction and to introduce the concept via a proof. Partway through the lesson students will utilize the collaborative whiteboards located at each pod to work on example problems. I think that I am currently underutilizing the technologies available to me. Even if I don’t necessarily add technology to the lesson, I think I can use the current technologies (the white boards) in a much more effective fashion.

Pedagogy 

In the lesson’s current form the pedagogy is mainly direct instruction. The proof at the beginning of the lesson is important to understanding the concept, and as I mentioned in the first blog post, I believe it needs to stay in the lesson in some way. I wonder about the location of the proof however. I’m not sure that the best place for it is at the beginning. As Bransford, Brown, and Cocking (1999) point out in their book How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School, the authors explain that when faced with tasks lacking apparent meaning or logic, it will be “difficult for them (students) to learn with understanding at the start; they may need to take time to explore underlying concepts and to generate connections” (p. 58). This lesson currently does a poor job of taking that fact under consideration. Some of the pedagogy is okay. There is a period during the lesson when students will be working in small groups on example problems. This allows students to work collaboratively and to construct some meaning from the concepts, but only after a lot of the meaning has been given to them directly. They are not given time (or proper methods) to construct it for themselves.

Content Knowledge 

This lesson is conceptually difficult, even for me. I understand it for myself, but struggle to do an effective job of helping my students truly understand it. Understanding the Fundamental Theorem requires a solid understanding of the meaning of the derivative. Students also need to have a solid understanding of the definite integral, beyond just being able to complete the basic definite integral problems. A basic understanding of limits is also helpful. One of the reasons this concept is so difficult for students to understand is that it relies on the strong understanding of so many other concepts in calculus. Beyond the calculus concepts that underly the Fundamental Theorem, a strong understanding of the meaning of a function is also important. Many students make it all the way to calculus without a strong understanding of the meaning of a function. A misconception at any one of these concepts can make the understanding of the proof and it’s extensions difficult.

The Context

Much of the context of this lesson was explained above but I can’t stress the importance of taking this into consideration enough. There has to be a solid understanding the previous concepts. In addition to prior concepts, providing students a view of the big picture is also really important, so I need to help students see where the concept leads also (Bransford et al, 1999, p. 42). This concept helps us find antiderivatives for numerous functions that we would not be able to find otherwise. Providing students with this information should help them to better contextualize the concept.

Intersections: Technology and Pedagogy

The value in the TPACK model is in understanding that all of these pieces are connected. The pedagogy I utilize is directly affected by the technology I have available and vice versa. In it’s current form my technology (mainly the large whiteboard at the front of class and the “mega” whiteboards on each pod are being underutilized as a pedagogical tool. My lesson plan is currently very teacher centered and not learner centered. I need to spend some more time digging into the concept to develop other ways to better utilize my technology. I’m not sure yet if “new” technologies (like Wolfram Alpha, or other powerful graphing tools) will be beneficial or not.

Intersections: Content and Pedagogy

The important thing to understand about the intersection of the content and the pedagogy is that this concept is incredibly dynamic. The pedagogy utilized depends on the students’ construction of the prior knowledge leading up to the lesson, more so than many concepts. In a sense the quality instruction in the weeks leading up to this concept are as important as the lesson itself. One of my goals in this lesson revision is to spend time really deconstructing the content for myself and from this deconstruction find a more inquiry based approach.

Intersections: Technology and Content

Often there is an assumption that mathematics is married to calculators. In this lesson the calculator is almost a hinderance. Anything the calculator can do will essentially be a shortcut and will cause the students to create misconceptions. I want the technology that we use to help students reason their way through the concepts and develop meaning as they go. I want to avoid technology that will provide shortcuts but result in misconceptions.

Striking a proper balance between these three intersections should result in a quality lesson. My aim is to take a very teacher centric lesson, and turn it into a more inquiry based lesson in which students can better construct the concept of the Fundamental Theorem.

References

Bransford, J. D., Brown, A. L., & Cocking, R. R. (1999). How people learn: Brain, mind, experience, and school. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press.

Mishra, P., & Moehler, M. (2004). Using the TPACK Framework: You Can Have Your Hot Tools and Teach with Them, Too. Learning & Leading with Technology, 14-18.

 

Lesson Plan (Version 1.0)

The lesson I’ve chose to focus on covers the concept of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. It is possibly the most important concept that is taught in high school mathematics and it comes shortly after students learn about definite integrals, usually a little past half way through the school year (in a typical calculus course). The last two years I’ve done this very traditionally. I begin the lesson with a proof of the Fundamental Theorem. I then do a few example problems that are similar to what they’ll have to do on their assignment. I follow up and formatively assess the next day following this process. They are also assessed on the chapter test, and through their reflective learning blogs. Here is the lesson and below is the objective.

Objective: At the end of this lesson students will be able to explain and articulate the concepts within the fundamental theorem of calculus, apply them to appropriate problem sets and use the concept in the context of more complex problems.

I’ve chosen to revise this for two reasons. First, it is incredibly dry. Regardless of how animated I am as I lecture it is a difficult concept to stay engaged with. It is a powerful concept and it deserves a lesson that is equally as powerful . Second, it is incredibly teacher centered. I need to find a way to get students to play or engage with the concept first, taking into account their preexisting knowledge and it’s affect on how they will be able to learn this concept. I want to build in a way for students to explore or tinker before moving onto the proof. In this circumstance I do think the proof is important and should stay in the lesson in some way (be it on video or in person). In the past students come away with only a basic understanding and real difficulties applying the concept to more complex problems. Hopefully, through several iterations of this lesson, I can actually accomplish the objective above.

 

It’s the Soft Skills!

This trimester I don’t teach in a flipped classroom. Precalc is done for the year, AP calculus is not flipped, and Algebra II is taught by myself and another teacher and is typically done very traditionally. This being the case, my goal this trimester is to “inject” solid higher level thinking activities into my lessons. Last year when I taught it (the first time) was very traditional (Lecture, assignment, repeat). The catch 22 of this that I haven’t had these students all year. They are coming to me from traditional classrooms and are not familiar with the different format of my classes (mega whiteboards, relaxed deadlines, higher level thinking, collaboration, etc.). I wanted to reflect on a few things that I noticed in the last couple days that I may have taken for granted.

Collaboration

For some reason, in the back of my mind, I just assumed that juniors in high school knew how to collaborate. This is not true. At least it isn’t true for my students. As you can see in the image my class is set up in pods and each day they come to class with a mega whiteboard and a few markers at their pod. (This is to encourage collaboration on “normal” days, not just days in which we have special activities.) Today I gave them an activity to help them discover the connection between combinations, binomial expansion, and Pascal’s triangle. I prefaced the activity with an emphasis on the need to collaborate and to share ideas with each other. I noticed that even the “best” groups struggled with this.

There were several specific problems I noticed. First, students didn’t use the mega whiteboards very often. Even when I explicitly said, “hey, this would be a good problem to do on the board.” Second, there was minimal communication between group members that “got it” and those that were still struggling. Third, there was minimal critique of each others work. for instance if one person had the correct answer, in many case everyone else just copied down the answer.

Tomorrow I will be making a point to talk about the best ways to collaborate. I failed to recognize their lack of skills in this area and I need to do a better job of setting them up for success in the area of collaboration. I also need to continue to try to build a community in which wrong answers are not shunned but are view as just a step in the learning process.

How do you help your students to collaborate more effectively? What do you do to help your students feel like they can share without the fear associated with being wrong?

Communication

This is intimately connected to collaboration, but my students ability to communicate mathematics needs improvement. I think the more I help my students with this the better collaboration will be. How can I expect students to collaborate if they can’t communicate the math to each other?


 

I hope that I’ll continue to see improvement in these areas as the trimester continues. Please give me any ideas that you have to increase students’ ability to communicate and collaborate. I’d love to hear them! Image

“Opening up” Math Class

In an effort to write more I’m going to be posting shorter posts on things that are on mind regarding education and mathematics. Writing helps me process and refine my ideas and I believe it will make me a better educator.

I often think about “opening up” my math class. By “opening up” I mean developing my class in such a way that students have time to explore ideas (preferably ideas that are of interest to them, but also concepts that are in the standards).  In this setting students would be encouraged to do a number of things on a regular basis.

First, they’d be encouraged to explore wrong answers. If a student got an answer wrong they would take time to figure out why, and represent the correct solution in multiple ways (graphing, algebraically, numerically, verbally, etc.). We so often don’t have time for this and don’t value this type of exploration. I think that should change.

Second, they’d be encouraged to take ideas further on their own, in class. A good example is synthetic division vs. long division of polynomials. We always tell students that synthetic division only works in certain situations, but what about that student that wants to know why? How do we support that student? Because if that student is allowed to explore that idea he/she will likely come away with an understanding of polynomials that is far deeper than if I just told him/her the reason. (God forbid the student came up with a reason I hadn’t thought of!)

Third, students would be encouraged to work on meaningful tasks involving mathematics in small groups. These might be “real world” projects or, equally valuable, deep explorations in mathematics. The objective for the group would be not only to solve the problem(s) but to be able to communicate the solution in a meaningful (dare I say visually meaningful and appealing) way.

I do some of this on a small scale in my various classes, but I am quite often up against two major adversaries: the curriculum and time. Although I am up against this, I think that if I “opened up” my class my students would become better thinkers, communicators, and self-motivated learners. In general I think they’d become more mathematically minded and I think it is incredibly valuable to have a society of mathematically minded individuals (more on this in a future post!). I think this is why educators have to be creative, take risks, and embrace technology. That combination, for me, has been powerful in helping me to take what steps I have toward the “open” math class.

If I think of more ways in which math class could be opened up I will be sure to update. Please give me your feedback and ways in which you “open up” your class (math or otherwise)!

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“Develop and Sell it” – A (slightly) More Creative Approach to Related Rates

As we moved through the calculus unit on related rates I searched for a way to bring more meaning to the topic and to make it more exciting. Some students were struggling and I wanted a solid review day before the quiz. I came up with this “Develop and Sell it” Activity. Essentially I gave students 4 related rates problems that were as “real world” as I could find. I had students work in groups of two to four and told them that they could only work with their group. They were told that they worked for a firm that worked out related rates problems for companies. Their task was to “develop” the solution and “sell” their reasoning and solution to the company.

Once they had found solutions that each group member agreed to, I assigned each student in the room a number 1-4. Students who received a number 1, for example, then congregated and compared solutions and methods to that problem. This then allowed students to see different perspectives on the same problem and “argue” about whose answer was right. It was a tremendously engaging activity that the students enjoyed and it relied on one important piece: I couldn’t help at all. I didn’t tell them if their answer was right, if their method was correct, or “what I would do in their situation.” They had to rely on their reasoning and justification. Taking myself out of the equation forced students to analyze each other’s work and critique each other’s reasoning. That was the best part of the activity!

In the future I would love to get actual questions from companies and industry. I’ve also considered video questions and other ways to make the problems more authentic.

As usual, any feedback you can give me would greatly appreciated!

(Here is the Pages Version of the Activity)